Although I live in Ottawa, a city regularly visited by cold snaps, I was still a little unnerved recently while driving to an assignment along an isolated stretch of the Trans-Canada Highway near Deep River, Ontario. The thermometer on the car’s dashboard showed minus 34 Celsius, a good 10 to 15 degrees below normal temperatures for late January in the area.

—Ontario’s vibrant, French-speaking communities sometimes fly under the radar for many people, including some in French-speaking Quebec. But their fight for the right to be educated in French, which dates to the 19th century, ramped up again thanks to cuts by Premier Doug Ford.

—The Times’s Catherine Porter profiled Rev. Gretta Vosper who remains, for now, a United Church minister — despite her belief that the story of Christianity is “not entirely true.”

—Now that Bruce McArthur has pleaded guilty to a series of grisly murders, a judge must determine whether he’ll die in jail.

—Yet another staff member at the Canadian Embassy in Havana has been struck by mysterious and unexplained symptoms that resemble those from a concussion.

—Montreal-born Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the new music director of the Metropolitan Opera in New York, is one of the few major performing arts leaders in the United States who is openly gay.

—“Schindler’s List,” which just marked its 25th anniversary with a limited run in theaters, is among the February offerings from Netflix in Canada.

—After a slow start to their season, Andrew Knoll found that the Calgary Flames are “evolving into a team that plays with pace, vigor and swagger.”

—The publisher of The Times, A.G. Sulzberger, along with two of the paper’s White House correspondents, interviewed President Trump on Thursday in the Oval Office. Unsurprisingly, “fake news” came up.

—Millennials were once unjustly dismissed as slackers. Erin Griffith, a reporter in our San Francisco bureau, argue that their real shortcoming is a slavish devotion to work.